About NaN Spaceland

NaN Spaceland is Jack Llewellyn first release with NaN. It was conceived out of two points of interest: more generally, designs that are inherently digital in nature, and more specifically, the question of whether component shapes of letterforms can be simultaneously positive and negative. It builds on the geometry principle of the Boolean relationship, the intersection of two positive shapes creating a negative area. Spaceland’s glyphs show outlines that overlap each-others like a Mœbius strip in a mind-binding visual effect, confounding inner shapes and outer shapes, white space and black space.

Spaceland’s folding outlines creates breaking points in usually mono-linear forms. The style combines a relatively minimal grotesque with features that exaggerate the overlap, such as the large ‘ink-traps’ at stroke joins. In the thinner styles, the breaks are almost unnoticeable. Discreet, they bring a touch of elegance to the characters in an almost couture way. In the boldest styles the breaks are obvious, disturbing the calmer grotesque structure. At large sizes, they become almost illustrative traits, inviting the viewer to decipher the dance of shapes happening between the intertwined outlines. But at smaller sizes Spaceland’s grotesque skeleton takes over and the breaks almost blend in, only punctuating the text.

NaN Spaceland is named after the three dimensional reality in E. A. Abbot’s Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, from where the ‘stranger’ (sphere) visits the humble square in two dimensional Flatland. Ultimately, Spaceland is an invitation to play. Though built on serious foundations, its play on inner and outer space makes it an ultimately charming character, treating the reader as an equal in what is sometimes a visual jigsaw puzzle.

Typeface: NaN Spaceland
Lead Designer: Jack Llewellyn
Additional Production: Léon Hugues, Jean Baptiste Morizot
Year: 2022-2024
Languages: Supporting 310 latin based languages
(see PDF specimen)
Formats: TTF, WOFF2 (Autohinted)

Download PDF Specimen

Black* Domain Era for DX3906
Spaceland in Flatland
A glitch is a short-lived fault in a system, such as a transient fault that corrects itself.
#₦⁂¶!
Mathematically the Mœbius strip and the fourth dimension are both purely spatial concepts
Work Without the Worker
OEFENMATCHEN. KV Mechelen klopt Genk, zuinige zege voor Standard
Rays Center Fielder No. 947 in Draft, No. 1 in Defense
ANALYSE. Iedereen kijkt naar Sagan (behalve zijn eigen team)
Mendes vs. McGregor: UFC 189 Main Event Odds, Predictions and Tale of the Tape
Video: What It’s Like to Face a 150 M.P.H. Tennis Serve
Giants’ Jason Pierre-Paul Should Be Able to Overcome Loss of Finger, Former Players Say
Orienteering’s Key to Winning: Not Getting Lost
Boston’s 2024 Olympic Bid Faces Skepticism Despite New Proposal, Poll Finds
Glitchcore is a visual aesthetic where a normal image is edited and distorted to contain heavily saturated colours and flashing patterns. Glitchcore usually contains characters or artwork for cartoons/anime – in this way, Glitchcore is similar to aesthetics such as Mind Murder.
NEON COLORS REPRESENT AN ACID TRIP, ACCORDING TO BIANCA, “SOMETIMES, WHEN MC OCCURS IN A TF, IT FEELS TRIPPY. LIKE YOUR BRAIN IS SLIPPING AWAY FROM YOU.” SHE SAYS.
In computer science, the Boolean (sometimes shortened to Bool) is a data type that has one of two possible values (usually denoted true and false) which is intended to represent the two truth values of logic and Boolean algebra. It is named after George Boole, who first defined an algebraic system of logic in the mid 19th century. The Boolean data type is primarily associated with conditional statements, which allow different actions by changing control flow depending on whether a programmer-specified Boolean condition evaluates to true or false. It is a special case of a more general logical data type—logic does not always need to be Boolean (see probabilistic logic). Languages with no explicit Boolean data type, like C90 and Lisp, may still represent truth values by some other data type. Common Lisp uses an empty list for false, and any other value for true. The C programming language uses an integer type, where relational expressions and logical expressions connected by & and are defined to have value 1 if true and 0 if false, whereas the test parts of if, while, for, etc., treat any non-zero value as true. Indeed, a Boolean variable may be regarded (and implemented) as a numerical variable with one binary digit (bit), or as a bit string of length one, which can store only two values. The implementation of Booleans in computers are most likely represented as a full word, rather than a bit; this is usually due to the ways computers transfer blocks of information. In mathematics and mathematical logic, Boolean algebra is a branch of algebra. It differs from elementary algebra in two ways. First, the values of the variables are the truth values true and false, usually denoted 1 and 0, whereas in elementary algebra the values of the variables are numbers. Second, Boolean algebra uses logical operators such as conjunction (and), disjunction (or), and the negation (not). Elementary algebra, on the other hand, uses arithmetic operators such as addition, multiplication, subtraction, and division. Boolean algebra is therefore a formal way of describing logical operations, in the same way that elementary algebra describes numerical operations.
In computer science, the Boolean (sometimes shortened to Bool) is a data type that has one of two possible values (usually denoted true and false) which is intended to represent the two truth values of logic and Boolean algebra. It is named after George Boole, who first defined an algebraic system of logic in the mid 19th century. The Boolean data type is primarily associated with conditional statements, which allow different actions by changing control flow depending on whether a programmer-specified Boolean condition evaluates to true or false. It is a special case of a more general logical data type—logic does not always need to be Boolean (see probabilistic logic). Languages with no explicit Boolean data type, like C90 and Lisp, may still represent truth values by some other data type. Common Lisp uses an empty list for false, and any other value for true. The C programming language uses an integer type, where relational expressions and logical expressions connected by & and are defined to have value 1 if true and 0 if false, whereas the test parts of if, while, for, etc., treat any non-zero value as true. Indeed, a Boolean variable may be regarded (and implemented) as a numerical variable with one binary digit (bit), or as a bit string of length one, which can store only two values. The implementation of Booleans in computers are most likely represented as a full word, rather than a bit; this is usually due to the ways computers transfer blocks of information. In mathematics and mathematical logic, Boolean algebra is a branch of algebra. It differs from elementary algebra in two ways. First, the values of the variables are the truth values true and false, usually denoted 1 and 0, whereas in elementary algebra the values of the variables are numbers. Second, Boolean algebra uses logical operators such as conjunction (and), disjunction (or), and the negation (not). Elementary algebra, on the other hand, uses arithmetic operators such as addition, multiplication, subtraction, and division. Boolean algebra is therefore a formal way of describing logical operations, in the same way that elementary algebra describes numerical operations.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ”
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxtz
#0123456789
!?&%@
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ”
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxtz
#0123456789
!?&%@

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