About NaN Tragedy

NaN Tragedy is the unexpected consequence of time travel, a chimera child of two epochs. Its structure and energy are inheriting the pace of a religious scribe, while its geometrical detail treatment lies in the atom accelerator at CERN. Tragedy tells a story of oppositions lying in the same body. Classical but contemporary. Unconventional but functional. Energetic and lively but sturdy. Extravagant but evident and, ultimately, simple.

NaN Tragedy Text embraces the challenge of being a functional text typeface with unconventional shapes, applying an economical approach to display features with optical corrections, such as its exaggerated calligraphic contrast axis. These idiosyncrasies come upon a classic skeleton, leaning towards both typographic legacy and modernity. It mixes exaggerated and virtuosos forms (just check out those italics) with clarifying straightforward lines, creating a palpable tension within Tragedy’s entanglement of simplicity and drama.

This wonderful melodrama is exaggerated at the extremes of Tragedy’s family, with its Display cut embracing unruly theatrical expressions whilst emphasising the extravaganza of its Text counterpart. More compact and contrasting in nature, the design of Tragedy Text buckles down on finesse and character, crafting tight and impactful headlines.

Last born of the family, Tragedy Mono pushes its typographic contradictions even further, applying technological constraints foreign to its first era of inspiration. Tragedy’s modulated diagonal stress brings a texture rarely seen in a monospace font, clashing with the severe structures forced by the monospace constraint. As such, it might be the most modern sibling of the family.

On the design stage, NaN Tragedy is a versatile type family that is both sock and buskin, forever raising the question, can NaN Tragedy be really avoided?

www.infinite-tragedy.com

Typeface: NaN Tragedy
Lead Designer: Jean-Baptiste Morizot
Tragedy Mono:
Jean-Baptiste Morizot, Léon Hugues, Daria Cohen
Year: 2019-2023
Languages: Supporting 219 latin based languages
Formats: TTF, WOFF2 (Autohinted)

Download PDF Specimen

Microsite: www.infinite-tragedy.com

The Age of Precarity
The Faithful Shepherdess
Work Without the Worker
The Destruction of Reason, 1902
Life is a comedy to those who think, a tragedy to those who feel.
He who climbs upon the highest mountains laughs at all tragedies, real or imaginary.
OEFENMATCHEN. KV Mechelen klopt Genk, zuinige zege voor Standard
Rays Center Fielder No. 947 in Draft, No. 1 in Defense
ANALYSE. Iedereen kijkt naar Sagan (behalve zijn eigen team)
Mendes vs. McGregor: UFC 189 Main Event Odds, Predictions and Tale of the Tape
Video: What It’s Like to Face a 150 M.P.H. Tennis Serve
Giants’ Jason Pierre-Paul Should Be Able to Overcome Loss of Finger, Former Players Say
Orienteering’s Key to Winning: Not Getting Lost
Boston’s 2024 Olympic Bid Faces Skepticism Despite New Proposal, Poll Finds
One swallow does not make a summer, neither does one fine day; similarly one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy.
EDUCATING THE MIND WITHOUT EDUCATING THE HEART IS NO EDUCATION AT ALL.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ”
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxtz
#0123456789
!?&%@
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ”
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxtz
#0123456789
!?&%@
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ”
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxtz
#0123456789
!?&%@

Variable Font Preview

MorningWool

NaN Tragedy Mono

Monastic GPT4
The Automatic Shepherdess
WORK WITHOUT THE WORKER
Life is a comedy to those who think, a tragedy to those who feel.
He who climbs upon the highest mountains laughs at all tragedies, real or imaginary.
OEFENMATCHEN. KV Mechelen klopt Genk, zuinige zege voor Standard
Rays Center Fielder No. 947 in Draft, No. 1 in Defense
ANALYSE. Iedereen kijkt naar Sagan (behalve zijn eigen team)
Mendes vs. McGregor: UFC 189 Main Event Odds, Predictions and Tale of the Tape
Video: What It’s Like to Face a 150 M.P.H. Tennis Serve
Giants’ Jason Pierre-Paul Should Be Able to Overcome Loss of Finger, Former Players Say
Orienteering’s Key to Winning: Not Getting Lost
Boston’s 2024 Olympic Bid Faces Skepticism Despite New Proposal, Poll Finds
EDUCATING THE MIND WITHOUT EDUCATING THE HEART IS NO EDUCATION AT ALL.
using namespace std;
int main() {
float a, b, c, x1, x2, discriminant, realPart, imaginaryPart;
cout << 'Enter coefficients a, b and c: ';
cin >> a >> b >> c;
discriminant = b*b – 4*a*c;
if (discriminant > 0) {
x1 = (-b + sqrt(discriminant)) / (2*a);
x2 = (-b – sqrt(discriminant)) / (2*a);
cout << 'Roots are real and different.' << endl;
cout << 'x1 = ' << x1 << endl;
cout << 'x2 = ' << x2 << endl;
}
else if (discriminant == 0) {
cout << 'Roots are real and same.' << endl;
x1 = -b/(2*a);
cout << 'x1 = x2 =' << x1 << endl;
}
else {
realPart = -b/(2*a);
imaginaryPart =sqrt(-discriminant)/(2*a);
cout << 'Roots are complex and different.' << endl;
cout << 'x1 = ' << realPart << '+' << imaginaryPart << 'i' << endl;
cout << 'x2 = ' << realPart << '-' << imaginaryPart << 'i' << endl;
}
return 0;
}
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts”, a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale. The set went through three limited edition printings before Schmidt suddenly died in early 1980, after which the card decks became rather rare and expensive. Sixteen years later software pioneer Peter Norton convinced Eno to let him create a fourth edition as Christmas gifts for his friends (not for sale, although they occasionally come up at auction). Eno’s decision to revisit the cards and his collaboration with Norton in revising them is described in detail in his 1996 book A Year with Swollen Appendices. With public interest in the cards undiminished, in 2001 Eno once again produced a new set of Oblique Strategies cards. The number and content of the cards vary according to the edition. In May 2013 a limited edition of 500 boxes, in burgundy rather than black, was issued. In 1970, Peter Schmidt created “The Thoughts Behind the Thoughts” a box containing 55 sentences letterpress printed onto disused prints that accumulated in his studio, which is still in Eno’s possession. Eno, who had known Schmidt since the late 1960s, had been pursuing a similar project himself, which he had handwritten onto a number of bamboo cards and given the name “Oblique Strategies” in 1974. There was a significant overlap between the two projects, and so, in late 1974, Schmidt and Eno combined them into a single pack of cards and offered them for general sale.
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ”
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxtz
#0123456789
!?&%@

Variable Font Preview

MorningWool

Selected Opentype Features

Quarriors Long Tailed (Q)
Affamée Ligatures
Cyberpk 2148 Oldstyle Figures

Styles

  • NaN Tragedy Display Light
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  • NaN Tragedy Text Medium Italic
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  • NaN Tragedy Text Bold Italic

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36 styles
NaN
Metrify Latin Giga­wide
  • NaN Metrify A Latin Gigawide – Light
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  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Regular
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  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Medium
  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Medium Italic
  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Bold
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  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Extrabold
  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Extrabold Italic
  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Black
  • NaN Metrify C Latin Gigawide – Black Italic